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Monday, September 24, 2007

In search of those elusive features...

This past year I've been drawing and painting many, many, tiny, mostly-female faces. It can be frustrating trying to place tiny features in *just the right place* on bumpy, cold-press paper. So, I've been looking at how other artists have distilled features down to their minimal essence on small scale heads...



One of my childhood favorites being John R. Neill and all of his lovely pen-and-ink drawings of the denizens of Oz. From tiny, dotty shapes indicating eyes and nostrils to much more detailed features on larger faces.



In fact, his inking and characterizations are so beautiful I couldn't help but continue to draw them to get a feel for his shapes and strokes...

Next, is Carl Larrson and Jessie Wilcox Smith. (Who else would you suggest?)

An amazing blog I've just discovered is Gurney Journey, by James Gurney of the gorgeous Dinotopia. He has incredibly informative posts about the whole business of art and illustration. It is fascinating to see 'behind the scenes' of his process. He has an impressive post of penciled faces here. I'm debating whether to be motivated or daunted.

Back to it...

6 comments:

tongue in cheek said...

Oh aren't these sweet and delightful. Full of childhood promise and joy.

Eric Orchard said...

Manet did suprisingly charming little sketches. Also do you know Heinrich Kley? His small pen and ink studies are amazing. I like the donkey in particular.

dinahmow said...

I'm a bit of a duffer at drawing, but I have several Larsson prints and I love Arthur Rackham.
You, daunted? Never!

Cre8Tiva said...

you, of course...& the Andrew Loomis books are favs of mine...i also sketch faces every day...i like gurney's book of faces...the idea of collecting faces like stamps...love looking at your sketches...blessings, rebecca

CJ said...

Great links...love your sketches! I've always been rubbish at characterisation - guess that's why I stick to the farmyard! LOL. Have you ever been to lines and colors? He covers all kinds of diverse illustrative processes and features different artists in his blog.

leslie said...

Isn't James Gurney just the best?