Pages

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Baba Yaga WIP - initial color

Want to feel like you are painting forever without making any progress? Try doing four versions of the same illustration! *whew*

At the end of last post, I had printed out 4 versions of this drawing - 2 on cold press, 2 on hot. I painted a layer of Chinese White watercolor on one of each (to experiment with Edmund Dulac's technique). After that dried, I covered the whole surface with a wash of yellow ochre (it could be any color, and usually a darker value than this) - and while still wet, I pulled color back off the lightest areas.

I then started to lay down some initial layers of color. The underpainting of white makes the washes a bit opaque and chalky (somewhat like gouache), but also makes the color incredibly easy to lift. (Next time I'm trying a lighter layer of white paint).

(Here's an example of Dulac where you can really see the lifting)

Here are straight washes on hot press (left) and cold press (right). I normally paint on cold press - which I hugely prefer, and I intend to finish this one in the way that I normally work. The hot press is the underpainting for the oil washes.

Even though this is really time consuming, it is very interesting - and useful - to be able to compare papers and techniques side by side on the same painting. A thing I rarely take time to really explore. Here's hoping I can take these all fairly close to finish to get the full effect.

18 comments:

Jennifer Rose said...

oh this is looking great! Lots of work :D

Cat (darklingwoods) said...

She's fantastic! Love hearing the processes too!

Karen said...

Wonderful! so interesting to watch you trying this technique.
I'm looking forward to seeing it finished.

Vickie said...

I really like seeing this. It's so interesting seeing the technique. I've never really tried water colors because I thought they'd be too loose to work with. I may have to rethink that!

Blaze said...

You are so much more patient than I am! Four versions of the same painting! I am impressed. Thanks for sharing the progress shots - now I can learn through your efforts. *grin*

d. moll, l.ac. said...

Thanks for taking all this time and blogging it too. I am so interested in the lifting, I wan to try! Fabulous seeing all the techniques and two different papers and all. Sending you virtual chocolate as treat!

Aquarian Bath said...

looks great

Tatiana said...

What a fun experiment. You sound so scientific about testing the different papers and techniques.

Anonymous said...

wow elena

J.L.Meyer said...

Facinating, Ive not hear of this technique. Thanks for sharing.

Cant wait to see where your going with this.
How do you get the piece not to run on the print offs?

tlc illustration said...

Thanks all.

Vickie - if you paint fairly 'dry', they are not loose at all. And fairly easy to control.

d.moll - when I'm working, I'll take chocolate any way I can get it!

Jennifer - my Epson 1900 printer uses dye-based ink. Essentially waterproof. Great to paint on.

ruthie said...

Tara, this is so fascinating. i am intrigued by this process & would love to try it. beautiful illustration, so much detail, i love it & cant wait to see it completed! ps hope your mom's hol plans are coming together x

Rima said...

Hello Tara, this is so interesting to see... I am about to tackle old Baba Yaga soon myself.. a great subject eh!
Your work is beautiful and painstaking... :)
Rima x

Loreen Leedy said...

Nice work! I hadn't heard of using a layer of Chinese white, that's interesting. Just curious if a layer of white gesso would give a similar effect, allowing for easy lifting of the watercolor. They would have to be non-staining colors though. I have a vague recollection of doing something along that line eons ago... I didn't varnish it and the paint crawled in the Florida humidity(!)

Lisa Hunt said...

It looks like this painting is loaded with goodies. Interesting technique and it's always inspiring to see others push themselves and experiment with their materials. Thank you for sharing!

Anonymous said...

I really like the cold press one. That technique looks awesome!
-Ross

roz said...

So interesting to watch you experiment. All the subtle differences.

Diana said...

Thanks for all your tips. I scanned in one of my sketches and printed 4 thumbnails on w/c paper. What a great way to try different color choices!